Oldest Cranberry Bog in Canada

Department of Agriculture and Marketing (to Sept. 00)

December 23, 1998 11:55 AM

Agriculture and Marketing Minister Ed Lorraine today presented a
plaque to Glenn Hebb of Indian Garden Farm in Hebbville,
Lunenburg Co., commemorating his family's operation of the oldest
commercial cranberry bog in Canada.

The bog was developed by Mr. Webb's great-grandfather, William in
the late 1800s. It was subsequently operated by William's son
Fletcher, and then his grandson Gerald, who successfully upgraded
the bog to survive a downturn in the cranberry market in the late
1950s.

"It is a pleasure for me to visit the Hebb farm and to celebrate
the Indian Garden Bog as a unique part of Nova Scotia's farming
heritage," said Mr. Lorraine. "It's continuous operation for over
a century is unprecedented in Canada. It is a reminder that
innovation and being alert to opportunities have always been
important attributes of the agriculture industry and its people."

The plaque inscription reads:

"The Indian Garden Farm Cranberry Bog along the Petite River in
Hebbville, Lunenburg County, in the Province of Nova Scotia, is
the oldest commercial cranberry operation in Canada. It has been
in continuous production since the late 1800s. The marsh was
originally developed by William Hebb who had been in New England
and may have visited cranberry bogs in Massachusetts. It has been
operated by four generations of the Hebb Family.

"It is a notable example of the many cranberry bogs which were
developed across Nova Scotia during the late 1800s and the first
half of the 20th century. These developments were undertaken
without the aid of heavy machinery."

The plaque was signed by Bob Murray, a retired horticulturalist
with the Department of Agriculture and Marketing who is writing a
history of the province's cranberry industry and verified the
historic significance of the Indian Garden Bog.

The Hebb's Indian Garden cranberries are sold fresh during the
Christmas season and have helped Nova Scotians celebrate the
holidays for more than 100 years.

The Hebb farm is not a specialized cranberry operation, growing a
wide variety of fruit and vegetable crops. Glenn Hebb has long
been a supporter of growing cranberries in Nova Scotia and
opening opportunities for the province to reap the economic
benefits of sizeable North American and global cranberry markets.
He has been visited by countless people investigating cranberries
in recent years.
During the past two years a number of cranberry developments have
been undertaken in Nova Scotia and together have accounted for
20-25 per cent of the net investment into the agricultural
industry over this period.

Other fresh cranberry operations and brands in Nova Scotia
include Dew Drop Gardens in Grants Cove near Sheet Harbour, and
the Chase and Bezanson Cranberry Company of Aylesford, the
province's largest cranberry operation, which markets its
products under the Sun Valley label. The Duke of York Bog near
Arichat, Richmond Co., was developed around the same time as the
Hebb's Indian Garden Bog, but has not been in continuous
operation and is currently being redeveloped.

NOTE: The following is intended for use by broadcast media.


     The oldest commercial cranberry bog in the country

was honoured today in Hebbville, Lunenburg County.

     Nova Scotia Agriculture and Marketing Minister

Ed Lorraine presented a plaque to Glenn Hebb of Indian

Garden Farm to commemorate his family's operation.

     The Hebb's commercially developed the bog in the late

19th-century.

     Indian Garden cranberries are sold fresh during the

Christmas season helping Nova Scotians celebrate the holidays

for more than 100 years.

-30-

Contact: David Robinson
         Agriculture and Marketing
         902-424-8859
         E-mail: drobinson@gov.ns.ca


jmg                      Dec. 23, 1998         11:50 a.m.