Teachers Gather for First Gaelic Summer Institute

Department of Education (to March 26, 2013)

July 5, 2004 3:57 PM

"Ciamar a tha thu?" will replace "How are you?" as the standard
greeting this week as teachers gather for a summer institute on
Gaelic language and culture in Mabou, Inverness Co.

The institute is a first for Nova Scotia, with a focus on
teaching Gaelic through language instruction and cultural
experiences.

"Through this institute, teachers are learning more about how to
share both the Gaelic language and culture with their students,"
said Education Minister Jamie Muir. "As a result, young Nova
Scotians will have a greater appreciation of the Gaels' role in
this province's past, present and future."

More than 30 musicians, historians, researchers, artists,
teachers and students will help deliver the daily workshops that
will be attended by about 30 teachers and other interested
individuals. Key presenters include CBC journalist Linden
MacIntyre and Gaelic recording artist Mary Jane Lamond.

Teachers will receive daily Gaelic lessons and instruction on
teaching the language from Andy MacDonald, an immersion teacher
from Scotland. His participation in the institute was facilitated
by the memorandum of understanding between the Scottish Highland
Council and the Province of Nova Scotia.

In addition to learning about teaching, the language educators
will get a taste of Nova Scotia's Gaelic culture. They will
sample traditional square dancing, music, story telling and a
milling frolic -- in which participants pound wool while singing
songs. The teachers will also visit several cultural and
historical locations in Inverness Co.

The workshops are designed to benefit a range of teachers,
including those who teach the Gaelic language, social studies,
art, music, Canadian history, cultural industries 11, Gaelic
studies 11, tourism 11, and dance 11.

The institute is taking place in Mabou because of its strong
Gaelic community and heritage. From the late 18th century until
the mid-19th century, Scottish immigrants who settled in
northeastern Nova Scotia formed distinct communities where Gaelic
and its associated cultural expressions have been carried on for
generations.

The Gaelic summer institute runs from today, July 5 to Friday,
July 9 at Dalbrae Academy. It is one of many professional
development opportunities offered by the Department of Education
during the summer. A complete list of the department's 2004
summer institutes is available at www.ednet.ns.ca .

The Department of Tourism, Culture and Heritage is supporting the
institute by paying Mr. MacDonald's travel expenses and
accommodations within Nova Scotia. The Scottish Highland Council
is paying for his travel to and from the province.


FOR BROADCAST USE:

     "Ciamar a tha thu?" (Kimmer-A-HAWU) will replace "How are

you?" as the standard greeting for teachers this week during

Gaelic workshops in Mabou, Inverness Co.

     The Gaelic summer institute is being held at Dalbrae Academy

from July 5th to the 9th.

     The institute is a first for Nova Scotia. Its focus is on

teaching Gaelic through language instruction and cultural

experiences.

     About 30 participants will have daily Gaelic lessons and

instruction on teaching the language.

     They will also get a taste of Nova Scotia's Gaelic culture

through square dancing, music and visits to cultural and

historical locations.

     Education Minister Jamie Muir says teachers are learning

how to share both the Gaelic language and culture with

their students so they have a greater appreciation of the Gaels'

role in Nova Scotia's past, present and future.

-30-

Contact: Adèle Poirier
         Department of Education
         902-424-8307
         E-mail: poiriea@gov.ns.ca

jal         July 5, 2004        3:56 P.M.