Agreement will Save on Power Bills, Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Energy/Environment

September 14, 2012 5:56 PM

The province's approach to clean energy has helped save Nova Scotia families an additional $1.3 billion on their power bills, while achieving the federal government's new greenhouse gas emission targets.

New coal-fired electricity regulations, released by the federal government on Sept. 12, would mean the province's eight coal-fired plants in Trenton, Lingan, Point Tupper and Point Aconi would have to close prematurely at a cost of up to $1.3 billion to Nova Scotia ratepayers.

Instead, the province has negotiated a better option that will avoid a hit to Nova Scotia families that would have been equivalent to $3,450 per household.

The draft Canada-Nova Scotia Equivalency Agreement for Coal-Fired Electricity released today, Sept. 14, will ensure that the province will reduce greenhouse gas emissions using its own regulatory approach instead of Canada's new coal-fired electricity regulations. The same greenhouse gas target will be achieved but at a much lower cost.

The agreement also strengthens Nova Scotia's renewable energy plan and protects ratepayers from the volatility of imported coal.

"This is a made-in-Nova Scotia solution that wouldn't have been possible if not for the strength of our greenhouse gas regulations and renewable energy plan," said Environment Minister Sterling Belliveau. "There is only one way to make sure we're getting the lowest, fairest prices -- make the shift from imported coal to stable renewable energy right here in Atlantic
Canada."

Nova Scotia is the only jurisdiction in North America with hard caps on greenhouse gas emissions for electricity providers, reducing 25 per cent of greenhouse gases in the electricity sector by 2020. With the additional greenhouse gas reductions up to 2030 as required by the equivalency agreement, Nova Scotia will cut emissions by more than half.

Nova Scotia can now reach 30 per cent of its power from renewables on a windy day -- more than double what it was in 2009.

"Nova Scotia is making great strides, but we still have work to do to achieve the legislated target of 40 per cent," said Energy Minister Charlie Parker. "Wind, tidal, biomass and hydroelectricity from Lower Churchill must all be a part of that mix.

In just over three years, the province developed and implemented a range of clean, renewable energy policies that will result in improved air quality and stable prices for Nova Scotians for the long term."
     
"The province will keep working hard to get control of our energy future, making sure Nova Scotians are getting the lowest, fairest power rates, while protecting our environment," said Mr. Belliveau.

More information on the agreement can be found at www.gov.ns.ca/nse/climate-change/ .

The agreement is available at www.gazette.gc.ca/index-eng.html


The deadline for public comment is Nov. 14.

FOR BROADCAST USE:

The province's approach to clean energy is helping to save

Nova Scotia families an additional $1.3 billion on their power

bills, while achieving the federal government's new greenhouse

gas emission targets.

The province has negotiated a better option that will avoid a

hit to Nova Scotia families that would have been equivalent to

$3,450 per household.

     The draft Canada-Nova Scotia Equivalency Agreement for Coal-

Fired Electricity released today (September 14th), will ensure

that the province will reduce greenhouse gas emissions using its

own regulatory approach instead of Canada's new coal-fired

electricity regulations. The same greenhouse gas target will

be achieved but at a much lower cost to ratepayers.

The agreement also strengthens Nova Scotia's renewable energy

plan and protects ratepayers from the volatility of imported

coal.

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Media Contacts: Jodi Sibley
                Dept. of Environment
                902-233-1608
                E-mail: sibleyjm@gov.ns.ca

                Tracy Barron
                Dept. of Energy
                902-424-1757
                E-mail: barrontb@gov.ns.ca