Marine Heritage Database

Erg - 1943

Ship Type

Typical Profile

Tonnage

28

Length(ft)

55

Breadth(ft)

14.7

Depth(ft)

7.2

Masts

Decks

Hull

Steel

Shipwreck Details

Description

One of the earliest steel vessels built in Halifax, ERG started life as SAMBRO, a steam tug built and owned by Halifax Shipyard. She was sunk by the Halifax Explosion in 1917 but raised in 1927. She was renamed ERG and had a diesel engine installed to become a work boat, ferrying workers and their equipment to vessels under repair. By the time of her loss she was equipped with air compressors and electrical generators to support welding and pneumatic tools.

Story

ERG was sunk for the second of three times in a collision with NORELG a Norwegian freighter. This Halifax Shipyard tug was previously sunk during the Halifax Explosion in 1917, but was later re-floated, renamed and put back into service. The tug was carrying shipyard workers when a freighter arriving in Bedford Basin overtook her in fog and rain to strike her on the port side, and only five of the 24 men on board were saved. All three crew members lost their lives. An inquiry blamed carelessness and a poor look-out about NORELG. Fourteen days after sinking, ERG was raised by the floating crane LORD KITCHENER and the bodies of 10 victims removed. ERG was then resunk near Roach Cove in Bedford Basin and forgotten. In 2001, a team from the Nova Scotia Undersea Exploration Society located and identified the wreck.

Vessel Type

Motor, Harbour Tug

Type of Event

Loss

Nature of Event

Collision

Cause of Event

Judgement error

Date of Wreck

1943-07-06

Location

Bedford Basin, Halifax Harbour

Cargo

Shipyard workers

Lives Lost

19

Voyage from

Halifax, Nova Scotia , Canada

Voyage to

Bedford Basin, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Remarks

Ship Construction

Built at

Halifax, Nova Scotia , Canada

Date

Registered at

Halifax, Nova Scotia , Canada

Date

Propulsion

Diesel, Screw

Rig

None

Details

In 1927 under the name SAMBRO, ERG was refitted with a 4 HP diesel engine which replaced her steam engine. After this refit her name was changed.

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