On the Rocks: Shipwrecks of Nova Scotia - Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Marine Heritage Database

SS Hungarian - 1860

Ship Type

Typical Profile

Tonnage

1487

Length(ft)

Breadth(ft)

Depth(ft)

Masts

Decks

Hull

Shipwreck Details

Description

Built for the Montreal based Allan Line's Liverpool service, HUNGARIIAN was an iron hulled steamer with a barque rig and a single funnel, one of Canada's largest steamships. She was part of a new four ship fleet, intended to provide more economical, weekly sailings for the company's long established colonial service.

Story

HUNGARIAN's captain was apparently searching for a glimpse of Cape Sable Island when disaster struck. Flares from the steamer were sighted at about three in the morning and fishermen on Cape Sable saw people clinging to HUNGARIAN's masts at daybreak but seas were too high to render aid. Debris washing ashore soon revealed the full extent of the tragedy. They included personal belongings, part of the ship's cargo of fine textiles, a number of bodies and according to legend, a diary, whose last, sad entry, "Lizzie dies tonight," became a popular ballad. All 205 people aboard were lost. The wreck led directly to the establishment of the Cape Sable lighthouse the following year. Extensive salvage was performed on her wreck in subsequent years. HUNGARIAN is one of countless wrecks in the Cape Sable-Seal Island area. No underwater archaeology has been conducted in the area, although Parks Canada has done some survey work. Strong currents and rip tides make the area a dangerous challenge for even experienced divers.

Vessel Type

Steam

Type of Event

Loss

Nature of Event

Stranded

Cause of Event

Stress of weather

Date of Wreck

1860-02-20

Location

Cape Sable, The Horse Race

Cargo

Lives Lost

205

Voyage from

Queenstown, Greater London , England

Voyage to

Portland, Maine , United States

Remarks

Ship Construction

Built at

Date

Registered at

Canada

Date

Propulsion

Rig

Screw

Details

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Maritime Museum of the Atlantic

Original Data Design by Katherine Riordan, Computers for People

This Web Site is dedicated to the memory of Terry Shaw

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Comments to: Maritime Museum of the Atlanic      / Last updated on 2007-10-05

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