On the Rocks: Shipwrecks of Nova Scotia - Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Marine Heritage Database

Vulcan - 1830

Ship Type

Typical Profile

Tonnage

Length(ft)

Breadth(ft)

Depth(ft)

Masts

Decks

Hull

Shipwreck Details

Description

Story

The crew of this timber brig were all saved by the rescue station which had been established on the island by Mary Hitchens in 1823. This was one of the last wrecks on the island before the Hitchens family persuaded the Nova Scotia government to build a lighthouse which went into operation later in 1830. Mary Hitchens had grown up in nearby Barrington and was all too familiar with the many deadly wrecks in the area and the annual discovery of dead mariners on Seal Island. Soon after she was married, she persuaded her husband (who was himself a shipwreck survivor) to move to Seal Island where they operated a rescue station, launching boats when possible to make rescues and providing shelter for those who survived. Their many rescues such as VULCAN and careful recording of the large number of wrecks at Seal Island persuaded the government to erect a lighthouse in 1830.

Vessel Type

Brig

Type of Event

Loss

Nature of Event

Wrecked

Cause of Event

Unknown

Date of Wreck

1830-01-01

Location

Seal Island, Little Beach

Cargo

Lumber

Lives Lost

Voyage from

Voyage to

Remarks

Ship Construction

Built at

Date

Registered at

Date

Propulsion

Sail

Rig

Brig

Details

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Maritime Museum of the Atlantic

Original Data Design by Katherine Riordan, Computers for People

This Web Site is dedicated to the memory of Terry Shaw

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Comments to: Maritime Museum of the Atlanic      / Last updated on 2007-10-05

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