Habitat Conservation Fund 2010 Approved Projects


logo

Priority Activities | Conditions for Awarding Grants | Proposal Submission Form | Funded Projects


Nature Conservancy of Canada - Johnston’s Pond Land Acquisition Project
Amount Awarded: $20,000.00
Johnston’s Pond is an undisturbed estuary and barrier beach located at the tip of the Port L’Hebert peninsula. The Pond's salt marshes, estuarine ponds, mudflats and beach and dune system are nesting and foraging habitat for shorebirds, including the Piping Plover and the Red Knot, both COSEWIC listed endangered species. The surrounding coastal forests support other species of fauna and flora such as American Black Bear and the endangered Boreal Felt Lichen. In partnership, NCC will secure, and steward in perpetuity, coastal upland habitat buffering the pond, critical for migratory birds and other wildlife species.

Final Report

Friends of Redtail Society - Sheltering Forests Project
Amount Awarded: $50,000.00
A significant block ( initially 313 acres) of woodland, formerly slated for clear cutting, will be purchased. Up to 1/3 of this will be preserved, with no development except walking trails. The remainder will be used for projects demonstrating sustainable uses of forest land. There will be improved wildlife habitat and water retention. A public education program showing the benefits of sustainable management will encourage improved habitat protection on other wood lots.

Final Report

Young Naturalists Club - Young Naturalists Club Expansion Project
Amount Awarded: $20,825.00
The Young Naturalists Club is free nature club for kids 8 - 12 year olds that imparts natural history knowledge through interactions with adult naturalists and through experiences in nature.  Club members learn about Nova Scotian wildlife species, and the importance of wildlife habitat conservation.  A strong conservation ethic is developed in Club members through positive experiences with naturalists and during wildness experiences.  The Expansion Project will bring the benefits of the Club to more Nova Scotian communities.

Final Report

Nova Scotia Nature Trust - Saving Spaces for Species
Amount Awarded: $15,00.00
Species at risk (SAR) are an integral part of Nova Scotia’s natural and cultural history.  They have key roles in maintaining healthy ecosystems, and provide opportunities for education, research, and recreation - all in ways that are compatible with preserving their habitat.  This project will engage Nova Scotians in learning about, and stewarding, habitat for species at risk.  This work will promote, and possibly lead to, permanent protection of important wildlife habitat conservation.

 Final Report

Ducks Unlimited Canada - Project Webfoot Wetland Education Program 2010/2011
Amount Awarded: $18,000.00
“Project Webfoot” focuses on enhancing the attitudes and behavior of our youth towards conserving wetlands and raising the value of a healthy environment. By fostering understanding of the importance of these natural areas, DUC encourages youth to take positive actions now and throughout their lives. The project involves delivery of curriculum linked education resources to grade 4 classes, and offering local wetland field trips.

 Final Report

Hope for Wildlife Society - Youth Environmental Day Camp Pilot Project
Amount Awarded: $5,000.00
Be educating children and youth how their actions affect the environment, our day camps will foster a sense of respect and pride for wildlife habitats. Camp activities will be geared towards teaching children and youth how they can help protect habitats in their everyday lives, but also how they can make a more direct contribution to protecting habitat by getting involved with protection and restoration projects through volunteerism and advocacy.

 Final Report

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - NS - Bridging the Ages: Understanding our Natural World
Amount Awarded: $7,500.00
CPAWS NS will partner senior residents of Nova Scotia who possess knowledge and appreciation of the natural environment with youth (~200) who want to experience Nova Scotia's wilderness and waters. The partnered mentors and youth will participate in a wilderness and wildlife activity of their choice (whether it is fishing, bird watching, nature photography) to share their knowledge and stories of their interactions and work with Nova Scotia’s natural environment through their life.

 

Bird Studies Canada - Building Capacity for Coastal Waterbird Monitoring at Important Bird Area sites on the South Shores of Nova Scotia
Amount Awarded: $7,000.00
We will develop and coordinate volunteer training sessions to train and support wildlife enthusiasts in monitoring shorebirds and other coastal bird species at Important Bird Areas (IBAs) on the South Shore of Nova Scotia. Participants will be asked to act as “caretakers” for Important Bird Areas of the South Shore by participating in regular monitoring visits using skills learned in our training sessions. Caretakers will also help identify threats to habitats, leading to improved habitat conservation.

Final Report

Saint Mary’s University - BioBlitz: Facilitating Education on Biodiversity and the Conservation of Wildlife Habitats
Amount Awarded: $7,000.00
BioBlitz is a 24-hour event that facilitates collaboration of local experts to obtain a quantitative estimate of the biodiversity within a given wilderness area. This survey results in a species inventory and database that will be used for assessing and monitoring biodiversity through time. Students, as well as local community members, are encouraged to participate in this event, which will foster awareness and education of biodiversity and conservation of local wildlife species.

 Final Report

Acadia University - Ecological value of restored and engineered wetlands
Amount Awarded: $6,000.00
The Nova Scotia Eastern Habitat Joint Venture (NS-EHJV) identified wetlands in agricultural landscapes as an area of priority conservation for wildlife species.  The Annapolis Valley has many restored wetlands, but there is limited information on how these wetland benefit wildlife.  We are conducting long-term research on wildlife use of restored wetlands.

Final Report

Acadia University - Habitat use by en route migratory songbirds in coastal Nova Scotia
Amount Awarded: $20,000.00
We will investigate the habitat requirements of en route migratory songbirds in coastal areas of Nova Scotia. Specifically, we will test how habitat quality of island versus mainland stopover sites influences decisions regarding the continuation of migration. We will focus on two species, Northern Waterthrush (Seiurus noveboracensis) and Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus). Individuals will be tagged at mainland and island sites, and tracked using radio telemetry and a network of tower-mounted automated telemetry receivers.

Final Report

Acadia University - Irving Botanical Gardens - ‘Habitat Heroes’ - Children’s Ecology Camp
Amount Awarded: $2,700.00
The Acadian Forest Region is an at-risk eco-region that requires conservation stewards. Currently, very little education happens within the public education system surrounding this unique and at-risk region. The ‘Habitat Heroes’ camp will educate children on the importance of habitat conservation within the Acadian Forest Region using a variety of creative and engaging educational tools.

Final Report

St. Margaret’s Bay Stewardship Association - Micou’s Island Coastal Habitat Restoration and Stewardship Project
Amount Awarded: $7,000.00
As part of a larger strategy to protect and enhance islands and coastal wildlife habitats in St. Margaret’s Bay, the Micou Island Habitat Project will engage a group of scientific experts and volunteer stewards to rehabilitate a wetland/dunes area and a section of eroding shoreline around the island. The work will be documented and used as an educational program for youth and coastal land owners throughout St. Margaret’s Bay as well as provide critical baseline information for future island stewardship projects.

 Final Report

Mersey Tobeatic Research Institute - Monitoring Flying Squirrel Survivorship
Amount Awarded: $5,000.00
Flying squirrels may be sensitive to fragmentation and good indicators of landscape connectivity because they need mature trees to climb for gliding and to sleep in during the day. To understand the connectivity requirements of flying squirrels in Nova Scotia, local life history data are required to determine how long they live, how many young they have and how they disperse. With this project, live-trapping, PIT tags, and nest boxes will be used to collect life history data for flying squirrels.

 

Bird Studies Canada - Maritimes Breeding Bird Atlas Year 5- Last chance to put Nova Scotia’s bird biodiversity on the map!
Amount Awarded: $14,300.00
Knowing where birds are and how many is a crucial first step to conserving wild birds and their habitats. The MBBA is a five year project to determine the distribution, abundance and status of birds breeding in NS. 2010 marks the final year of data collection for the Atlas, and out last chance to get a complete picture of NS bird biodiversity. Funding from the NSHCF will be used to complete surveys and ensure that the projects full conservation potential is reached.

Final Report


Total Projects Approved: 15
Total Amount Approved: $ 205,325.00