Lobbyists’ Legislation Brought Back

Department of Justice

March 26, 2001 7:00 PM

Legislation that will require lobbyists to publicly register
their activities was brought forward today by Justice Minister
Michael Baker. The bill is intended to ensure that those who are
paid to lobby government or civil service members do so in an
open and transparent manner.

“We believe in accountability,” said Mr. Baker. “This is another
indication of our commitment to openness in government.”

The legislation requires lobbyists to register with a registrar
of lobbyists.

A consultant lobbyist is defined as an individual who is paid to
lobby on behalf of a client. An in-house lobbyist is defined as
an employee who is paid to lobby on behalf of his or her
employer.

Within 10 days of becoming engaged in the lobbying process, a
consultant lobbyist must provide their own name and address and
that of the client or firm (or any of its subsidiaries) for whom
they are working or by whom they are employed. As well, the name
and address of any organization that contributed $750 (or more)
in the previous fiscal year toward the lobbyist’s activities on
behalf of the client must be included.

An in-house lobbyist has two months to register and will be
required to provide their own name and address and that of their
employer and the name and address of any organization which may
have contributed $750 (or more) toward the in-house lobbyist’s
activities. They must also indicate whether their employer is
funded by government.

Lobbyists must provide a description of the issue for which they
are lobbying, the communication techniques to be used and whether
they expect to lobby members of the legislative assembly or their
staff. The relevant legislative proposal, policy or program must
also be identified. They must also outline whether they are being
paid on a contingency basis.

If the registrar requires additional information, the lobbyist
will have 30 days to supply it. As well, notice must be given to
the registrar within 30 days of the completion of an undertaking
or the completion of the contract.

In-house lobbyists will be required to follow similar procedures.

This information will be made available to the public. A lobbyist
in violation of the act may be fined up to $25,000.


FOR BROADCAST USE:

     Legislation to require lobbyists to publicly register their

activities was brought forward today by Justice Minister Michael

Baker.

     Mr. Baker called the legislation another indication of the

government’s commitment to openness.

     Under the new law, lobbyists will have to register within 30

days of being engaged by a client. If employed as an in-house

lobbyist, they will have two months to register.

     Lobbyists will have to provide detailed information

about their activities. They must also outline whether they are

being paid on a contingency basis.

     A lobbyist in violation of the act may be fined up to

$25,000.


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Contact: Michele McKinnon
         Department of Justice
         902-424-6811
         E-mail: mckinngm@gov.ns.ca

cb             March 26, 2001      7:18 P.M.