Banning Some Sales

Department of Justice

April 18, 2001 2:50 PM

Regulations to restrict the sale of stolen goods at commercial
flea markets have now been approved by Cabinet. The regulations,
which are effective immediately, specify which goods are
prohibited from sale, and what paperwork is required for those
selling legitimate goods.

"We want to restrict the market for stolen goods. It’s that
simple," said Mr. Baker. "Legitimate vendors will have no
problems selling their products."

Vendors will no longer be able to sell used or unused
commercially manufactured tools without proof of purchase from a
producer, manufacturer, wholesaler or retailer. The same applies
to commercially manufactured used or unused razor blades, skin
creams, toothpastes, deodorants, perfumes and any other toiletry
items.

If vendors are selling unused commercially manufactured goods
(including brand-name clothing) they must have proof of
acquisition. This includes the name and address where the goods
were acquired and a copy of the sales receipt or other written
proof that the goods were lawfully purchased. If the goods were
not obtained from a manufacturer or wholesaler, an identification
number from a drivers’ licence or identifying number from a
similar piece of identification is required. The information must
be maintained by the vendor for at least one year after the goods
are sold. Proof of acquisition must also be provided by vendors
selling used, commercially manufactured pre-recorded video and
audio cassettes, compact discs, video games, computer software
and digital video discs.

"We have been pushing for this legislation for some time now,"
said Peter O’Brien, vice president Atlantic, Canadian Federation
of Independent Business. "We’re very pleased the regulations are
now in force. This will have a very positive impact on retailers
experiencing high levels of shoplifting and I want to publicly
thank the Justice minister for making this a reality."


FOR BROADCAST USE:

     Regulations to restrict the sale of stolen goods at

commercial flea markets have now been approved by Cabinet.

The regulations, which are effective immediately, specify

which goods cannot be sold and what paperwork vendors must

provide when selling legitimate goods.

     Justice Minister Michael Baker says government wants to

restrict the market for stolen goods.

     Legitimate vendors will have no problems selling their

products.

-30-


Contact: Michele McKinnon
         Department of Justice
         902-424-6811
         E-mail: mckinngm@gov.ns.ca

kjd         April 18, 2001      2:47 P.M.