Gaelic Communities To Get Road Signs

Department of Transportation and Public Works (to Oct. 23 2007)

May 12, 2006 1:56 PM

Nova Scotia communities with Gaelic origins may soon greet drivers in two languages.

The Department of Transportation and Public Works has a new policy that allows bilingual (English and Gaelic) community boundary signs for Gaelic communities.

"Scottish Gaels are one of Nova Scotia's largest ethnic groups, and the language is an integral part of our culture," said Transportation and Public Works Minister Angus MacIsaac.

Mr. MacIsaac, who is also the minister responsible for Gaelic Initiatives, added that the signs acknowledge the importance of preserving the Gaelic culture and demonstrates to both residents and visitors the pride we place in our language.

The new policy allows bilingual signs where a community demonstrates Gaelic culture as its origins. Such communities exist in the counties of Antigonish, Inverness, Victoria, Cape Breton, Richmond, Guysborough and Pictou.

Signs will be erected where the request is made through a resolution of a council in which the community lies.

The community boundary signs will be displayed on secondary highways only.


FOR BROADCAST USE:

     Nova Scotia communities with Gaelic origins may soon greet

drivers in two languages.

     The Department of Transportation and Public Works has a new

policy that allows bilingual English and Gaelic community

boundary signs for Gaelic communities.

Transportation and Public Works Minister Angus MacIsaac says

these signs acknowledge the importance of preserving the Gaelic

culture, and shows the pride Nova Scotians have in the Gaelic

language.

     The policy applies to municipalities of the counties of

Antigonish, Inverness, Victoria, Cape Breton, Richmond,

Guysborough and Pictou.

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Media Contact: Dan Davis
              Transportation and Public Works
              902-424-8978
              E-mail: davisds@gov.ns.ca