News release

Aboriginal Set-aside Procurement Strategy Signed

NOTE: A list of the aboriginal set-aside projects follows this release.

A new aboriginal procurement strategy for the Sydney Tar Ponds and Coke Ovens cleanup ensures aboriginal involvement for the rest of the project.

Building on the success of the cooling pond remediation project, the Mi'kmaq First Nations of Cape Breton and government partners signed a procurement strategy that identifies projects set aside for companies with majority aboriginal ownership and control. The strategy satisfies the terms of a procurement agreement signed by the First Nations and government in 2005.

"The aboriginal procurement strategy is a solid example of the province partnering with Aboriginal Canadians in a way that leads to greater economic opportunities and promotes developing abilities and resources in an emerging industry," said Premier Rodney MacDonald. "Aboriginal companies across Canada can now be a part of this important environmental remediation project."
"The five First Nations communities in Cape Breton worked diligently with both the federal and provincial governments to develop a strategy that satisfies the economic goals of our communities," said Membertou Chief Terrance Paul. "The result is a strategy that benefits aboriginal communities in a sustainable way."

Three Cape Breton companies with majority aboriginal ownership and control worked together to remediate the cooling pond, a circular body of water once located on the former Sydney steel plant site. The water was removed from the man-made pond and its sediment later stabilized and made into a solid. In April, the hardened material was capped and seeded.

"This strategy expands on the success of the cooling pond project," said Murray Scott, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal. "The training and skills acquired will benefit aboriginal contractors and the completed works will benefit the future of all Nova Scotians."

The overall value of the aboriginal strategy set-aside projects is estimated at $19 million, including the cooling pond project.

The government of Canada and the province of Nova Scotia signed a memorandum of agreement on May 12, 2004, committing to remediate the Sydney Tar Ponds and Coke Ovens sites. It is a $400-million agreement that specifies the cleanup be complete by 2014.

FOR BROADCAST USE:

A new aboriginal procurement strategy for the Sydney Tar Ponds and Coke Ovens cleanup ensures aboriginal involvement for the rest of the project.

Building on the success of the cooling pond remediation project, the Mi'kmaq First Nations of Cape Breton and government partners signed a procurement strategy that identifies projects set aside for companies with majority aboriginal ownership and control. The strategy satisfies the terms of a procurement agreement signed by the First Nations and government in 2005.

The overall value of the aboriginal strategy set-aside projects is estimated at $19 million, including the cooling pond project.

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Media Contact:

Cathy MacIsaac
Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal 902-424-8978 E-mail:
  • Coke Ovens Brook Sediment Removal Conditioning and Transport
  • Stockpiling of Capping Material
  • Coke Ovens Brook Sediment Removal and Groundwater Collection
  • Water Treatment Operations
  • Operation of Material Processing Facility
  • Construction and maintenance of access roads
  • Environmental Controls
  • Cooling Pond
  • Local Economic Benefits Office
  • Pilot-Scale testing