News release

Intense Weather Can Lead to Storm Surge in Southwestern Nova Scotia

The Emergency Management Office (EMO) is asking Nova Scotians to take measures to protect themselves in the event of a storm surge.

Environment Canada is predicting that Tropical Storm Kyle will pass over southwestern Nova Scotia this evening at the same time as the tide is high. The predicted storm surge of one metre from Kyle, on top of dangerous rough surf, may lead to shoreline erosion and damage to coastal infrastructure, mainly in Yarmouth and Digby counties.

"Nova Scotians are no strangers to storms such as Kyle," said Carolyn Bolivar-Getson, Minister of Emergency Management. "Although such storms can be unpredictable, I encourage people to listen to updates, consider their own family plans and have emergency kits ready, just in case."

A storm surge is an abnormal rise in water levels along the coast and is particularly dangerous when an intense storm arrives at the same time as high tide.

There are many coastal communities in Nova Scotia that could be affected by storm surges and coastal flooding. Getting caught near the shoreline during a storm surge could be life- threatening. It is important to take measures to protect yourself, your family and your property.

To prepare for a storm-surge related emergency, there are a number of things that can be done in advance:

  • Prepare an emergency supply kit that includes food, a supply of drinkable water, clothing, blankets, medication, flashlight and a first aid kit. Include any important documents and a list of property and personal items.
  • Listen for warnings. Include a battery-operated radio in an emergency kit to check for weather warnings.
  • Develop an family plan. Agree on a location to meet if separated during an emergency and make sure to know the emergency plans for schools, offices, daycare and other places where families spend time.
  • If a region is prone to flooding, check basements for important or valuable items and move them to a higher level in the home.
  • Know how to turn off water, gas and electricity in case instructed to do so by local officials.

If ordered to evacuate because of a storm surge, take appropriate measures:

  • Have an evacuation plan. Make sure family members know what to do in the event of an evacuation.
  • When ordered to go, leave immediately and take an emergency supply kit.
  • Listen to the radio and follow instructions from local emergency officials.
  • Follow evacuation routes. Do not take shortcuts. A shortcut could lead to a restricted or dangerous area.

For further information on storm surges and evacuation plans, visit EMO's website at www.gov.ns.ca/emo .

FOR BROADCAST USE:

The Emergency Management Office (E-M-O) is asking Nova Scotians to take measures to protect themselves in the event of a storm surge.

Environment Canada is predicting that Tropical Storm Kyle will pass over southwestern Nova Scotia this evening at the same time as the tide is high. The predicted storm surge of one metre from Kyle, on top of dangerous rough surf, may lead to shoreline erosion and damage to coastal infrastructure, mainly in Yarmouth and Digby counties.

Carolyn Bolivar-Getson, Minister of Emergency Management, says although such storms can be unpredictable, she encourages people to listen to updates, consider family plans and have emergency kits ready, just in case.

A storm surge is an abnormal rise in water levels along the coast and is particularly dangerous when an intense storm arrives at the same time as high tide.

To prepare for a storm-surge related emergency, prepare an emergency supply kit with food, water, clothing, blankets, medication, flashlight and a first aid kit; listen for warnings on a battery-operated radio; agree on a location to meet if people get separated during an emergency; in flood-prone regions, move important or valuable items to a higher level in the home and know how to turn off water, gas and electricity.

If ordered to evacuate, make sure family members know what to do in the event of an evacuation; leave immediately and take emergency supply kits; listen to the radio and follow instructions from local emergency and follow the evacuation routes. Shortcuts can take to restricted or dangerous areas.

For more information, visit EMO's website at w-w-w dot gov dot n-s dot c-a slash e-m-o.

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Media Contact:

Jodi Sibley
Emergency Management Office 902-424-1906 Cell: 902-223-3857 E-mail: