News release

Parents Reminded Not to Buy Lottery Tickets for Children as Holiday Gifts

The holiday season is fast approaching and the Nova Scotia Gaming Corporation is helping promote a responsible gambling message by urging parents not to purchase lottery products as gifts or stocking stuffers for minors.

"Lottery and Scratch N' Win tickets seem like fun gifts, but it is gambling and youth should not be engaged in those activities," said Marie Mullally, president and CEO of the Nova Scotia Gaming Corporation (NSGC). "We take this matter seriously because we know that playing the lottery at a young age can increase the potential for problem gambling later in life."

Results from a recent study showed that 19 per cent of high school students reportedly received one or more lottery tickets or scratch cards as gifts, of which 86 per cent came from a family member.

The results coupled with the growing concern about adolescent problem gambling, prompted the National Council on Problem Gambling, the International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems and High-Risk Behaviors at McGill University, and NSGC to collaborate this holiday season to increase public awareness about the impact of giving lottery products as gifts to minors.

NSGC and Atlantic Lottery continue to take measures by including age of majority messaging on ticket lottery products and at the point of sale. Ticket lottery retailers are also committed to ensuring the 19 and over laws are enforced.

The gaming corporation asks that you give children the gift of responsibility. This holiday season, keep the person's age in mind when choosing to give lottery and scratch tickets as gifts.

FOR BROADCAST USE:

With the holiday season fast approaching, The Nova Scotia Gaming Corporation is helping promote a responsible gambling message by urging parents not to purchase lottery products as gifts or stocking stuffers for minors.

Marie Mullally, president and CEO of the Nova Scotia Gaming Corporation says Lottery and Scratch N' Win tickets seem like fun gifts, but it is gambling and youth should not be engaged in those activities.

The same age restrictions apply to the sale of lottery products as they do to alcohol and tobacco. There is research that suggests early exposure to gambling increases the potential for developing a problem with gambling later on in life.

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Media Contacts:

Robyn McIsaac
Nova Scotia Gaming Corporation 902-424-4433 E-mail:
Dr. Jeffrey Derevensky
International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems McGill University 514-398-4249 E-mail:
Megan Larsen
National Council on Problem Gambling 202-547-9204 E-mail: