Spotlight on Lifelong Learning

Labour and Advanced Education

March 26, 2012 2:09 PM

Four Nova Scotians are being recognized for sharing their stories of how lifelong learning is benefitting them at home and giving them the right skills for good jobs.

Students at the Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning wrote essays on how learning has touched their lives to celebrate Adult Learners' Week. A Literacy Nova Scotia event celebrated the winners.

Naomi Walker, 28, is one of this year's winners. The mother of two from Halifax returned to the classroom years after leaving Grade 9.

"As a young child and teen, the aspiration to excel in my schooling was never there. Now as a part of the adult learning program, I find myself inspired to reach my full potential," said Ms. Walker. "I have finally reached a secure position in my life where it is heading in a positive direction. I can finally be confident in myself."

As part of the province's workforce strategy, and the jobsHere plan to grow Nova Scotia's economy, a number of programs and projects help adult learners make the most of their abilities.

"Not only does lifelong learning benefit the individual, it has a positive impact on their families, their communities and the province as a whole," said Premier Darrell Dexter. "Ongoing training and skill development is the cornerstone of a strong and healthy workforce. The jobs of tomorrow, and many of the jobs of today, will require us to keep learning every day."

UNESCO's International Adult Learners' Week celebrates the achievements of adult learners and the organizations that support them, as well as the tremendous benefit of lifelong learning.

"I have met many people of all ages whose lives have been fundamentally changed by returning to the classroom," said Marilyn More, Minister of Labour and Advanced Education. "No matter what your situation, learning is the key to unlocking your full potential. I urge everyone to keep striving to better themselves and never stop learning."

Joanna Bisson of Antigonish, Yodit Matewos of Halifax, and Simone Beaudoin of Amherst, are the other adult learners recognized for their essays at the ceremony.

"Adult Learners' Week is a time for celebration because it reminds us that learning, which continues over our lifetime, adds to the quality of our lives," said Ann Marie Downie, executive director, Literacy Nova Scotia. "We develop skills that keep us connected to and growing in the workplace, family and community."

For more information about adult learning opportunities in Nova Scotia, go to http://careers.novascotia.ca or 1-877-go-NSSAL (1-877-466-7725).


FOR BROADCAST USE:

     Four Nova Scotians are being recognized for sharing their

stories of how lifelong learning is benefitting them at home and

giving them the right skills for good jobs.

     The writing contest was part of a celebration hosted by

Literacy Nova Scotia to kick off Adult Learners' Week.

     The winners of the contest were Naomi Walker of Halifax,

Joanna Bisson, of Antigonish, Yodit Matewos of Halifax, and

Simone Beaudoin of Amherst.

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Media Contact: Brian Taylor
              Labour and Advanced Education
              902-424-0281
              E-mail: taylorbk@gov.ns.ca