Preparing Cape Breton Students for Good Jobs

Department of Education (to March 26, 2013)

October 5, 2012 9:22 AM

More Cape Breton students are going into workplaces to help them make good career choices.

Deputy Premier Frank Corbett was at Glace Bay High School today, Oct. 5, to announce the expansion and introduction of co-operative education programs at schools across the province.

"Young Nova Scotians want to live and work in their communities," said Mr. Corbett.

"Co-op is a great way for students to get experience for future careers in areas such as health care, business, the trades and forestry sector. As part of Kids and Learning First, we want to link learning to the workplace and the co-op program is helping us do that."

Co-operative education is being introduced for the first time at
Baddeck Academy and Islands Consolidated in Freeport, Digby Co.

Glace Bay High and Breton Education Centre will now provide co-op programming to all eligible students. Previously it was only offered to students enrolled in Options and Opportunities (O2).

"My placement at the Northside Guest Home during the summer helped to influence my future because I really enjoyed working and caring for the residents," said Memorial High School student Alisha Prince.

"I would love to become a nurse when I am older and I think this experience really helped make my decision."

The program's growth at Sydney Academy and Riverview has led to the hiring of full-time co-op teachers at those schools. Co-op is now offered at 85 out of 87 high schools across the province.

"I am always looking for new and energetic talent, and through the co-op program I am able to meet and mentor young people who might decide to pursue this as a career some day," said Jared Wolf, chef and owner of Allegro Grill in Sydney.

"This is a winning combination for the students and myself."

Students who find it difficult to take co-op during the school year have the option to work with employers in the summer. More than 400 credits were earned this summer as the program expanded to 45 schools across the province.



To earn a high school credit, a student, 16 years of age or older, is required to complete 25 hours of in-class preparation on career planning, workplace readiness and health and safety. It is followed by 100 hours of placement with an employer. More than 4,000 credits were earned by students last year.

Under Nova Scotia's workforce strategy, the province is supporting learning and skill development and providing valuable workplace experiences for young people.


FOR BROADCAST USE:

     More Cape Breton students are going into workplaces to help

them make good career choices.

     Deputy Premier Frank Corbett was at Glace Bay High School

today, (October 5th) to announce the expansion and introduction

of co-operative education programs at schools across the

province.

     The program is being introduced for the first time at

Baddeck Academy and Islands Consolidated in Freeport, Digby

County.

     Glace Bay High and Breton Education Centre will also offer

co-op programming to all eligible students.

     Co-op is now offered at 85 out of 87 high schools across the

province.

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Media Contact: Gary Andrea
              Department of Education
              902-424-3150
              902-456-6196
              E-mail:andreagg@gov.ns.ca