News release

Unveiling New Radiation Treatment Clinic

Nova Scotians living with cancer will have shorter wait times and benefit from the latest treatment technology at an expanded radiation treatment clinic, unveiled in Halifax today, Oct. 11.

"It's a sad fact that cancer has touched most Nova Scotians' lives in one way or another," Premier Darrell Dexter said. "Tonight's event signals renewed hope in the fight against this deadly disease. This state-of-the-art facility means more Nova Scotians living with cancer will get the care they need, sooner."

The James and Edna Claydon Radiation Treatment Clinic is a joint initiative of the federal government, the QEII Foundation, Capital Health and the province.

"Cancer is a disease that can strike at any age and affects every gender and race," said Health and Wellness Minister David Wilson. "The province is proud to partner with the federal government, health-care providers and the community to ensure that all Nova Scotians have access to lifesaving, cancer-destroying treatment when they need it."

James and Edna (George) Claydon, who donated $1.5 million to the QEII Foundation to help with the expansion, attended the event.

The clinic will have three new linear accelerators, which will be used to treat patients in the coming weeks.

Victor Goldberg, QEII Foundation volunteer board trustee and campaign chair, said the community's overwhelming generosity was key to the foundation meeting its $4-million commitment.

"We are thrilled to celebrate the official unveiling and we are extremely grateful to James and Edna (George) Claydon for their generous support and to all donors who share our vision of better health," Mr. Goldberg said. "The foundation will continue to raise funds for radiation equipment and needs for patients struggling with cancer."

Chris Power, president and CEO of Capital Health, said the Nova Scotia Cancer Centre has a proud history of providing excellent health care.

"The new James and Edna Claydon Radiation Treatment Clinic will be able to provide that care in a world-class space with state-of-the-art technology."

Dr. Tetteh Ago, chief of radiation oncology at the QEII Health Sciences Centre, said it will make a significant improvement in delivering care.

"Linear accelerators are used to deliver high-dose radiation treatment to destroy cancer cells. This new equipment delivers more focused radiation on the cancer site, increases protection to the healthy surrounding tissue and helps shorten treatment times," Dr. Ago said.

The radiation therapy project was announced in March 2007, when Nova Scotia received $24 million from the federal government as part of the wait time guarantee projects in Cape Breton and Capital health authorities. The Nova Scotia Cancer Centre helped established a wait time guarantee to ensure all Nova Scotians in need of radiation services receive treatment within eight weeks.

FOR BROADCAST USE:

Nova Scotians living with cancer will have shorter wait times and benefit from the latest in treatment technology at an expanded radiation treatment clinic, unveiled today in Halifax.

Premier Darrell Dexter says the state-of-the-art facility will mean more Nova Scotians living with cancer will get the care they need, sooner.

The James and Edna Claydon Radiation Treatment Clinic is a joint initiative of the federal government, the QEII Foundation, Capital Health and the province.

James and Edna (George) Claydon donated one-point-five million dollars to the QEII Foundation to help with the expansion.

-30-

Media Contacts:

Brooke Armstrong
Premier's Office 902-424-2402 Cell: 902-499-8819 E-mail:
Nicole Brooks
Health and Wellness Cell: 902-233-2809 E-mail:
John Gillis
Capital District Health Authority Pager 902-458-5376 E-mail:
Tanya MacLean
QEII Foundation Cell: 902-489-5664 E-mail: