News release

Equipment Furthers Quality Health Care

A machine that diagnoses and treats strokes and aneurysms is being upgraded by government and Capital District Health Authority.

The province is providing $1.85 million towards a new neuro-angiography imaging machine, to help doctors provide top-quality care in critical situations. To treat and diagnose neurovascular issues, images of small blood vessels in the brain must be clear and exact.

"Patients with neurovascular issues need complex care," said Health Minister Leo Glavine. "Ensuring we have the necessary equipment for safe, accurate and timely diagnosis and treatment in these situations is important to patients and families. This equipment means Nova Scotians will continue to access quality health care when they need it."

The current neuro-angiography machine at the QEII Health Sciences Centre's Halifax Infirmary site is nine years old and cannot provide as detailed images as newer machines.

The unit treats up to six patients a day from across the province and some from other parts of Atlantic Canada.

"The treatment of neurovascular conditions, for example, cerebral aneurysms, requires very precise positioning of tiny catheters, wires and coils," said Dr. David Barnes, district chief diagnostic imaging. "This new device will ensure that our patients will continue to receive world-class neurovascular care here in Nova Scotia."

Capital medical equipment needs are identified by district health authorities then reviewed and approved by the Department of Health and Wellness. Purchases are cost-shared between the government and district health authorities. Upgrading the neuro angiography imaging machine was listed as a priority to provide quality and safety in health care for Nova Scotians.

FOR BROADCAST USE:

A machine that diagnoses and treats strokes and aneurysms is being upgraded by the province and Capital District Health Authority.

The province is providing 1-point-85 million dollars towards a new neuro-angiography imaging machine. The current equipment at the QEII Health Sciences Centre's Halifax Infirmary site is nine years old and can't provide the same detailed imagery as new machines.

Health and Wellness Minister Leo Glavine says the new equipment will mean safe, accurate and timely diagnosis and treatment for patients with neurovascular issues.

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