News release

Guidelines and Criteria Released for Hub School Model

Parents, community members and school boards in Nova Scotia can now explore innovative ways of using public schools to further enhance and strengthen their local communities.

Education and Early Childhood Development Minister Karen Casey today, July 21, released the guidelines and criteria for the Hub School Model in response to concerns heard by Bob Fowler who led the school review process study in the winter.

"I know there are some communities working on their proposal to strengthen the role of their school and offering more access to students and their families," said Ms. Casey.
"This is another step in restoring trust in the school review process by giving parents and communities more options to work with boards to ensure schools remain an important part of the community for years to come."

The guidelines and criteria clearly spell out what can and cannot be considered for a public school building.

The guidelines for making a proposal must demonstrate how they can support the following:

  • an environment that is in the best interests of students
  • an environment that does not negatively impact student learning and engagement
  • improved service delivery for families and communities
  • no increase to capital or operational costs for the school board.
"I am pleased to see the public release of the hub school guidelines and criteria," said Mr. Fowler.
"I believe with strong community leadership and willing partners that these guidelines and criteria will encourage quality education programing and community growth. The road map is available if the leadership and partnership is there."

Eligible partners could include other levels of government, community organizations, sport and recreation, arts and culture groups, and local businesses that provide services to families, students and children.

It will be up to school boards to evaluate and determine if a proposal is suitable based on specific criteria, including:

  • the health and safety of students and staff is not at risk
  • the school's ability to deliver the public school program is not compromised
  • the proposed use is appropriate for the school setting and respects the mission and vision of the school board
  • it aligns with the policies and long-range plan of the school board
  • it makes reasonable and appropriate use of public infrastructure.

The timeline for communities to prepare a proposal will be at least eight months. The boards will have up to two months to consider a request. School boards also have the option to extend time frame where necessary.

Ms. Casey accepted in principle all recommendations in the School Review Process Study Report and Recommendations. The Hub School Model will be included in the ministerial policy on school review that will be introduced in the fall.

The guidelines and criteria for a Hub School Model are available at http://www.ednet.ns.ca/schoolreview .

FOR BROADCAST USE:

Parents, community members and school boards in Nova Scotia can now explore innovative ways of using public schools to further enhance and strengthen their local communities.

Education and Early Childhood Development Minister Karen Casey today (July 21st) released the guidelines and criteria for the Hub School Model in response to concerns heard by Bob Fowler who led the school review process study in the winter.

Ms. Casey says this is another step in restoring trust in the school review process by giving parents and communities more options to work with boards to ensure schools remain an important part of the community for years to come.

The guidelines and criteria clearly spell out what can and cannot be considered for a public school building.

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Media Contact:

Michelle Lucas
902-222-1784 E-mail: