COVID-19: travel

Information for international and interprovincial travellers, including travel restrictions and the self-declaration process for entering Nova Scotia.

Travelling into Nova Scotia from outside Atlantic Canada

Everyone who travels from outside Atlantic Canada into Nova Scotia (including travelling through Nova Scotia to another destination) must self-isolate for 14 days when they arrive in Nova Scotia, or for the duration of their stay if it’s less than 14 days. If they have already self-isolated in another Atlantic Canadian province, they may enter Nova Scotia without self-isolating again. You don’t need to self-isolate if you’re exempt from self-isolation.

Self-isolation means you go directly to your destination and stay there for 14 days, or for the duration of your stay if it’s less than 14 days. Don’t take a bus and avoid taking a taxi if possible. Don’t have visitors. Make plans to have groceries and other supplies delivered.

Every adult (18 or older) travelling into Nova Scotia from outside Atlantic Canada needs to complete a Self-declaration Form before they travel to the province, unless they’re exempt from self-isolation. This includes Nova Scotia residents (18 or older) who have travelled outside Atlantic Canada and are returning to the province.

If you’re travelling through Nova Scotia to another province you should make as few stops in Nova Scotia as possible. You should self-isolate as much as you can and follow social distancing guidelines with people who are not travelling with you.

People from outside Atlantic Canada also need to follow public health directives while they're in Nova Scotia.

Travelling outside Atlantic Canada

Avoid non-essential travel outside Canada until further notice.

If you travel outside Atlantic Canada you must self-isolate for 14 days from the day you get back to Nova Scotia, even if you don't have symptoms. You don’t need to self-isolate if you’re exempt from self-isolation.

The destination you’re travelling to may have different rules and public health measures in place to protect residents from COVID-19. Do your research before leaving so you’re prepared for when you arrive.

Returning residents

Nova Scotia residents (18 or older) who have travelled outside Atlantic Canada need to complete a Self-declaration Form before they return to the province, unless they’re exempt from self-isolation.

Self-declaration form to enter Nova Scotia

Every adult (18 or older) from outside Atlantic Canada needs to complete a Self-declaration Form before they travel to the province, unless they’re exempt from self-isolation.

When you arrive in Nova Scotia you need show that you submitted the form by providing the confirmation email you receive after submitting the form to border officials. You also need to provide government-issued identification (for example, Driver's Licence or Health Card) or a utility bill or bank statement that shows your permanent home address.

Online form

Complete the Self-declaration Form (Tracking Travellers to Nova Scotia) online.

Start now

You can use the Self-declaration Form - Tracking Travellers to Nova Scotia (PDF 117 kB) if you’re unable to complete the form online. A paper copy of the Self-declaration Form is also available at entry points to Nova Scotia for people who don't have access to the form online.

Compliance checks and enforcement

Once you’re in the province, a Government of Nova Scotia official will call you each day of your isolation period. If you don’t respond to the calls, police will visit the address you provided for self-isolation or self-quarantine in Nova Scotia to confirm compliance (this happens after you don’t answer 3 calls in one day).

You could be fined $1,000 for a first offence. If you’re found guilty of a second or subsequent offence, you could be fined up to $10,000 and imprisonment for up to 1 year.

Exceptions

If you’ve been granted an exception in advance of travelling to Nova Scotia, when you arrive in Nova Scotia you need show the email you received from the Government of Nova Scotia granting you an exception to border officials. If you have been granted an exception you don’t need to complete a Self-declaration Form.

Atlantic travel bubble (travel within Atlantic Canada)

Travel within Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador is permitted without the requirement to self-isolate for Atlantic Canadian residents. If you live in an Atlantic Canadian province, you need to show proof of residency when you enter Nova Scotia.

When Atlantic Canadians arrive in Nova Scotia, every adult needs to provide government-issued identification (like a Driver's Licence or Health Card) or a utility bill or bank statement that shows their permanent home address. A self-declaration form isn't required to enter Nova Scotia.

Atlantic Canadians also need to follow public health directives while they're in Nova Scotia.

Government of Canada travel advisory

The Government of Canada has issued an official travel advisory asking Canadians to avoid non-essential travel outside Canada until further notice.

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